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People CritiqueChess in a Parisian park

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Bob Yankle
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Chess in a Parisian park

Postby Bob Yankle » Fri Oct 13, 2017 1:05 pm

To me, street photography usually boils down to what to include and what to remove. Does one do that by cropping in closer or use brute force erasing or cloning? My usual approach is to include enough of the surrounding people and buildings/environment to give the main subjects "context". And,it has the added benefit of letting the viewer's eye wander about a bit after they have looked over the main subject.
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St3v3M
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Re: Chess in a Parisian park

Postby St3v3M » Thu Oct 19, 2017 4:36 am

Bob Yankle wrote:To me, street photography usually boils down to what to include and what to remove. ...

Depending on the available angles it might be easy to shoot the two from a view that isolates them, from another side, or even while standing on a chair above them, but I have to say I like this, the overall feel, the surrounding people helping the story along. The moment you've captured was well taken, also known as The Decisive Moment from a previous Monthly Masters, where I love the look of the two, the one seemingly winning and the other trying to figure out what to do. The processing style you've added is almost documentary with a somewhat newspaper look that bodes well with the style you are presenting here. Well taken! S-
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Bob Yankle
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Re: Chess in a Parisian park

Postby Bob Yankle » Thu Oct 19, 2017 12:12 pm

St3v3M wrote:Depending on the available angles it might be easy to shoot the two from a view that isolates them, from another side, or even while standing on a chair above them, but I have to say I like this, the overall feel, the surrounding people helping the story along. The moment you've captured was well taken, also known as The Decisive Moment from a previous Monthly Masters, where I love the look of the two, the one seemingly winning and the other trying to figure out what to do. The processing style you've added is almost documentary with a somewhat newspaper look that bodes well with the style you are presenting here. Well taken! S-


Thank you, Steve. I had never dabbled in Street Photography before until I rediscovered some old photos from Paris languishing in the archives.

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Re: Chess in a Parisian park

Postby St3v3M » Thu Oct 19, 2017 4:13 pm

Bob Yankle wrote:Thank you, Steve. I had never dabbled in Street Photography before until I rediscovered some old photos from Paris languishing in the archives.

If you find more post them here! S-
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Carol W
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Re: Chess in a Parisian park

Postby Carol W » Thu Oct 19, 2017 6:24 pm

Bob, I really like this one! Initially, it made me think of a Rockwell painting. I was totally drawn into the picture. I love the expression and body language of the gentleman in red as he contemplates his next move. To me, the background doesn't in any way detract. It provides context as well as further interest.

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Bob Yankle
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Re: Chess in a Parisian park

Postby Bob Yankle » Thu Oct 19, 2017 6:48 pm

Carol W wrote:Bob, I really like this one! Initially, it made me think of a Rockwell painting. I was totally drawn into the picture. I love the expression and body language of the gentleman in red as he contemplates his next move. To me, the background doesn't in any way detract. It provides context as well as further interest.
Thank you Carol. I got swept up in all the action in the background as well, and didn't want to lose any of it. The one exception might have been the man in the background in the left center of the left border, who got cut in two, but whose extremities extended beyond the left border. It's not good to have someone impinging on a border ....... but then, I've always figured it's sometimes permissible to bend the rules.

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Re: Chess in a Parisian park

Postby minniev » Sat Oct 21, 2017 1:50 pm

Bob Yankle wrote:To me, street photography usually boils down to what to include and what to remove. Does one do that by cropping in closer or use brute force erasing or cloning? My usual approach is to include enough of the surrounding people and buildings/environment to give the main subjects "context". And,it has the added benefit of letting the viewer's eye wander about a bit after they have looked over the main subject.

Your street approach is kinda like mine so I'm predisposed to like it whether we are "correct" or not. I never know when to quit when including context because I see this tree, that child, this woman and oh she has a little dog in her arms - and I keep the whole thing. Isolating the lead characters with proximity. If I can, I sometimes adjust aperture to isolate by DOF past the main subjects, sometimes I crop, sometimes I go back in PS and create a little more blur for that purpose, and sometimes I do a combination of several. I usually do not clone anything out of a street photo since all of it is part of the real world.

I have no trouble figuring out who the main characters are here in this one and can enjoy both them and their context. I like your processing approach, which feels rather Parisian to this old lady who knows nothing about Paris!
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Bob Yankle
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Re: Chess in a Parisian park

Postby Bob Yankle » Sat Oct 21, 2017 2:48 pm

minniev wrote: Your street approach is kinda like mine so I'm predisposed to like it whether we are "correct" or not. I never know when to quit when including context because I see this tree, that child, this woman and oh she has a little dog in her arms - and I keep the whole thing. Isolating the lead characters with proximity. If I can, I sometimes adjust aperture to isolate by DOF past the main subjects, sometimes I crop, sometimes I go back in PS and create a little more blur for that purpose, and sometimes I do a combination of several. I usually do not clone anything out of a street photo since all of it is part of the real world.

I have no trouble figuring out who the main characters are here in this one and can enjoy both them and their context. I like your processing approach, which feels rather Parisian to this old lady who knows nothing about Paris!
Thank you Minniev. As you say, our approaches are pretty much the same. I still live by the maxim, "shoot wide, crop narrow", but even then, one has to pick the subject wisely because if I go too wide, I lose some of the resolution I might have gotten with a tighter shot.


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