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Charles Haacker
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Eclipse! Did You Try a Shot? Post Here!

Post by Charles Haacker » Tue Aug 22, 2017 12:33 pm

I just realized I should invite critique of this shot even though it is not in Critics' Corner...
Elsewhere ( viewtopic.php?f=34&t=2747 ) Martha (Ceropegia) posted of her lovely experience with The Eclipse but somewhat sadly of having missed the shot of Totality.
Here in Lincoln, Nebraska, inside the northern edge of totality, our Eclipse was eclipsed by cloud cover. :( I figured it mattered little. NASA and the NWS and so on were going to get great stuff with professional equipment, some of it from space, so even if I couldn't see it so what. I didn't have the necessary special glasses, I have no solar filter for my camera, the camera is limited anyway, so on so forth yada et-cetera.

So (of course) as the Witching Hour approached I went out the back door to see what if anything could be attempted without either going permanently blind or literally frying the innards of my pretty-much-only camera...
DSC07705.MAX.jpg

My Kidz really like it. I think it's OOoooo-kay. There is the problem of the overcast. There is the problem of the wide-angle distortion. There is the problem that despite actually remembering to turn off the vibration damping there was also a pretty stiff breeze vibrating the camera during the 6-second exposure. Given that there was no point in trying a 200mm zoom shot even if there hadn't been cloud cover, I opted for this approach.
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Post by minniev » Tue Aug 22, 2017 12:41 pm

I think it's a cool shot, it captures the "feeling" of the moment, the darkness, the lit up houses, strange lighting emerging from beneath the cloud cover, and the tiny orb that explains the story we're seeing. It says more about the eclipse experience, as you and your family knew it, than any long lens could have said. Let NASA take the ultra detailed pictures. You've got the one that speaks for you and yours. You MUST print it. This will be a keepsake for your family for a long time.
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

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Charles Haacker
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Post by Charles Haacker » Tue Aug 22, 2017 12:47 pm

minniev wrote:I think is a cool shot, it captures the "feeling" of the moment, the darkness, the lit up houses, strange lighting emerging from beneath the cloud cover, and the tiny orb that explains the story we're seeing. It says more about the eclipse experience, as you and your family knew it, than any long lens could have said. Let NASA take the ultra detailed pictures. You've got the one that speaks for you and yours. You MUST print it. This will be a keepsake for your family for a long time.

Thanks so much, Min! You have justified my thinking, and when my son Matt saw it he said, "I want a print of that!" So we shall see... :)
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Post by Matt Quinn » Tue Aug 22, 2017 5:06 pm

Charles, I thought the same as you; others would get great shots of the event itself, so I wanted to be indirect and show the effects. Here's my best of one of my favorite spots, Herring Run. The light was like bright moonlight; spooky and eerily still. Yet the brook flowed on and the sun came out again. Matt
Partial eclipse (1 of 1).jpg
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Post by minniev » Tue Aug 22, 2017 10:34 pm

I was intrigued with the odd shadows during about 80% eclipse so got a cellphone snap of them- Myrtle leaves don't ordinarily make shadows like this.

IMG_0385.jpg
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Charles Haacker
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Post by Charles Haacker » Wed Aug 23, 2017 12:58 am

Matt Quinn wrote:Charles, I thought the same as you; others would get great shots of the event itself, so I wanted to be indirect and show the effects. Here's my best of one of my favorite spots, Herring Run. The light was like bright moonlight; spooky and eerily still. Yet the brook flowed on and the sun came out again.

A beautiful shot and imaginative "out-of-the-box" approach, Matt! I think this is the best shot you've shown of pickerel weed in that run. Somebody remarked (I can't recall who) that the moment of totality was like flipping a switch! I failed to notice that, being distracted with my camera, but I certainly did notice the eeriness, the automatic lights snapping on, the sense of a moonlit scene. :S
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Charles Haacker
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Post by Charles Haacker » Wed Aug 23, 2017 1:02 am

minniev wrote:I was intrigued with the odd shadows during about 80% eclipse so got a cellphone snap of them- Myrtle leaves don't ordinarily make shadows like this.

Min, I'm very sure what you have there is many, many pinhole views of the partial eclipse projected to the ground through the gaps in the leaves! There were other examples shown before the event, including people doing it with just interlaced fingers to make multiple projections. The bigger the holes the poorer the resolution, but all those identical bright crescents are the fuzzy image of the partially eclipsed sun! Woohoo! :thumbup: :clap:
Friends call me Chuck. :photo: This link takes you to my Flickr albums. Please click on any album to scroll through it.
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All the great photographers use cameras! No, really. :|

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Post by minniev » Wed Aug 23, 2017 3:41 am

Charles Haacker wrote:
minniev wrote:I was intrigued with the odd shadows during about 80% eclipse so got a cellphone snap of them- Myrtle leaves don't ordinarily make shadows like this.

Min, I'm very sure what you have there is many, many pinhole views of the partial eclipse projected to the ground through the gaps in the leaves! There were other examples shown before the event, including people doing it with just interlaced fingers to make multiple projections. The bigger the holes the poorer the resolution, but all those identical bright crescents are the fuzzy image of the partially eclipsed sun! Woohoo! :thumbup: :clap:

That's even cooler than I thought! Thanks Chuck, for explaining! I'm glad I stopped and snapped these!
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

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Post by St3v3M » Wed Sep 06, 2017 2:23 am

Charles Haacker wrote:... So (of course) as the Witching Hour approached I went out the back door to see what if anything could be attempted without either going permanently blind or literally frying the innards of my pretty-much-only camera...
...

I really like this and the overall feeling it gives. It's a wonderful sense of place! S-
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Post by St3v3M » Wed Sep 06, 2017 2:24 am

Matt Quinn wrote:Charles, I thought the same as you; others would get great shots of the event itself, so I wanted to be indirect and show the effects. Here's my best of one of my favorite spots, Herring Run. The light was like bright moonlight; spooky and eerily still. Yet the brook flowed on and the sun came out again. Matt

I wish I had done the same! S-
"Take photographs, leave footprints, steal hearts"

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