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Monthly Masters DiscussionMonthly Masters' Discussion - September 2019 - Can Surrealism Inform Photography? Dali's Melting Clocks

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minniev
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Monthly Masters' Discussion - September 2019 - Can Surrealism Inform Photography? Dali's Melting Clocks

Post by minniev » Sun Sep 01, 2019 11:02 am

Introduction
This month we will look at a painting by Salvatore Dali, one of the masters of surrealism in art. Dalí was born on in 1904 in Figueres, Spain. From an early age he was encouraged to practice his art, and he would eventually go on to study at an academy in Madrid. In the 1920s, he went to Paris and began interacting with artists such as Picasso, Magritte and Miró, which led to Dalí's Surrealist phase. Dalí was formally expelled from the Surrealist movement for political reasons but continued his work and amassed a body of work in a wide array of art media. Though chiefly remembered for his painterly output, in the course of his long career he successfully turned to sculpture, printmaking, fashion, advertising, writing, and, perhaps most famously, filmmaking in his collaborations with Alfred Hitchcock. He died in Figueres in 1989.

He is perhaps best known for his 1931 painting The Persistence of Memory, showing melting clocks in a landscape setting. (I was fortunate to stumble upon his sculpture of the melting clocks last week in Andorra, though I confess I didn’t know the sculpture version existed till then.)

Look over the painting, review some of the links below, and share with us your critical opinion about The Persistence of Memory.

Question to Consider

1. What is your opinion about the painting? The composition? The color? Does it evoke emotion? Would you want it on your wall? Why or why not?
2. What do you make of the symbolism presented in this image? What do the melting clocks mean? What does the title mean? What do you make of the distorted man on the ground?
3. Do you think an understanding of surrealism informs photographic art in any way? Why or why not? Are there any photographic artists who you think may have been influenced by the surrealist approach to art? If you know of one, share the name or link.
4. Have you ever taken or created an image that you think reflected a surrealistic approach? If so, we hope you’ll share it in your response.

Links for further study

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salvador_Dal%C3%AD
https://www.theartstory.org/artist/dali-salvador/
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Per ... _of_Memory
https://www.biography.com/artist/salvador-dali
https://thedali.org/timeline/
https://www.moma.org/artists/1364
https://www.dalipaintings.com
https://mymodernmet.com/the-persistence ... ador-dali/
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the-persistence-of-memory-salvador-dali-thumbnail-big.jpg
fair use: https://mymodernmet.com/the-persistence-of-memory-salvador-dali/
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

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Charles Haacker
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Post by Charles Haacker » Sun Sep 08, 2019 9:05 pm

minniev wrote:
Sun Sep 01, 2019 11:02 am
Introduction
This month we will look at a painting by Salvatore Dali, one of the masters of surrealism in art. ... He is perhaps best known for his 1931 painting The Persistence of Memory, showing melting clocks in a landscape setting. (I was fortunate to stumble upon his sculpture of the melting clocks last week in Andorra, though I confess I didn’t know the sculpture version existed till then.)

Look over the painting, review some of the links below, and share with us your critical opinion about The Persistence of Memory.

Question to Consider

1. What is your opinion about the painting? The composition? The color? Does it evoke emotion? Would you want it on your wall? Why or why not?
2. What do you make of the symbolism presented in this image? What do the melting clocks mean? What does the title mean? What do you make of the distorted man on the ground?
3. Do you think an understanding of surrealism informs photographic art in any way? Why or why not? Are there any photographic artists who you think may have been influenced by the surrealist approach to art? If you know of one, share the name or link.
4. Have you ever taken or created an image that you think reflected a surrealistic approach? If so, we hope you’ll share it in your response.
I love Dali, and I love this painting. It may have been the first surrealism I ever saw. I have "eclectic" tastes (read all his taste is in his mouth but he knows what he likes and will swallow almost anything). I'm the guy that wanders from gallery to gallery loving all of it; well, almost, and if I don't like it I can just keep on walkin'.

But here's the thing: I don't analyze. I have no training, formal or otherwise. I likes what I likes, and I likes a lot. I would have this painting on my wall--because I like it. Why? I dud doh. I just like it.

That's a distorted guy down there? I always thought it was like a conch shell (seriously). What do I think? I dud doh. But I like it. Melted clocks? Sure, why not. I dud doh. I like it.

Some of you may recall that I am pretty adamant that I ain't not no artiste. I do think I am a craftsman, and the longer I keep it up the more crafty I get, but my stuff is all about nuts and bolts, clean, shaaaaaaarp (above all), loooong scale, bright colors, and a solid black and a solid white somewhere in each frame. Composition? Oh, that. Suggestion of thirds? I dud doh. If my compositions are any good at all it's mostly on instinct; been shooting a long time and have always cropped in the camera as much as I could. I like Dali's composition but analyze it? Say why I like it? Nuh uh.

Because I am adamant that I ain't not no artiste I rarely attempt anything even remotely artsy, but something (??) impelled me a while ago to try this...
nightmare in paradise.jpg
It's a 3-layer composite using my alligator plus a couple of free stock shots from Pexels. It's called Nightmare in Paradise.
AmAlligator.jpg
Here's the original Albert, stuffed in a local museum
So where did Nightmare come from? What part of the unplumbed depth of my darkest psyche triggered it? I dud doh. I just liked it. It was fun and challenging (speaking of cutouts). I have not really done it again. I did do this, which is kind of surreal-ish...
DSC06344.second try-2.4Example.jpg
"Of Course I'll Take You With Me When I Go
DSC06344.4Example.jpg
The original was this grab shot, literal snapshot as I arrived to cover a Halloween event. I saw the Tyrannosaur in her Tutu and just fired. It was going to be trashed. There was no there there. But something stayed my hand and something else made me want to make this bizarre story of Supergirl and her pet looking out to sea (Pexel stock shot). I guess it's sort of surreal... I like it.
Friends call me Chuck. :photo: This link takes you to my Flickr albums. Please click on any album to scroll through it.
(I prefer to present pictures in albums because I can put them in specific order.)

All the great photographers use cameras! No, really. :|

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minniev
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Post by minniev » Mon Sep 09, 2019 12:39 am

Charles Haacker wrote:
Sun Sep 08, 2019 9:05 pm
minniev wrote:
Sun Sep 01, 2019 11:02 am
Introduction
This month we will look at a painting by Salvatore Dali, one of the masters of surrealism in art. ... He is perhaps best known for his 1931 painting The Persistence of Memory, showing melting clocks in a landscape setting. (I was fortunate to stumble upon his sculpture of the melting clocks last week in Andorra, though I confess I didn’t know the sculpture version existed till then.)

Look over the painting, review some of the links below, and share with us your critical opinion about The Persistence of Memory.

Question to Consider

1. What is your opinion about the painting? The composition? The color? Does it evoke emotion? Would you want it on your wall? Why or why not?
2. What do you make of the symbolism presented in this image? What do the melting clocks mean? What does the title mean? What do you make of the distorted man on the ground?
3. Do you think an understanding of surrealism informs photographic art in any way? Why or why not? Are there any photographic artists who you think may have been influenced by the surrealist approach to art? If you know of one, share the name or link.
4. Have you ever taken or created an image that you think reflected a surrealistic approach? If so, we hope you’ll share it in your response.
I love Dali, and I love this painting. It may have been the first surrealism I ever saw. I have "eclectic" tastes (read all his taste is in his mouth but he knows what he likes and will swallow almost anything). I'm the guy that wanders from gallery to gallery loving all of it; well, almost, and if I don't like it I can just keep on walkin'.

But here's the thing: I don't analyze. I have no training, formal or otherwise. I likes what I likes, and I likes a lot. I would have this painting on my wall--because I like it. Why? I dud doh. I just like it.

That's a distorted guy down there? I always thought it was like a conch shell (seriously). What do I think? I dud doh. But I like it. Melted clocks? Sure, why not. I dud doh. I like it.

Some of you may recall that I am pretty adamant that I ain't not no artiste. I do think I am a craftsman, and the longer I keep it up the more crafty I get, but my stuff is all about nuts and bolts, clean, shaaaaaaarp (above all), loooong scale, bright colors, and a solid black and a solid white somewhere in each frame. Composition? Oh, that. Suggestion of thirds? I dud doh. If my compositions are any good at all it's mostly on instinct; been shooting a long time and have always cropped in the camera as much as I could. I like Dali's composition but analyze it? Say why I like it? Nuh uh.

Because I am adamant that I ain't not no artiste I rarely attempt anything even remotely artsy, but something (??) impelled me a while ago to try this...

nightmare in paradise.jpg
AmAlligator.jpg

So where did Nightmare come from? What part of the unplumbed depth of my darkest psyche triggered it? I dud doh. I just liked it. It was fun and challenging (speaking of cutouts). I have not really done it again. I did do this, which is kind of surreal-ish...

DSC06344.second try-2.4Example.jpg

DSC06344.4Example.jpg
The original was this grab shot, literal snapshot as I arrived to cover a Halloween event. I saw the Tyrannosaur in her Tutu and just fired. It was going to be trashed. There was no there there. But something stayed my hand and something else made me want to make this bizarre story of Supergirl and her pet looking out to sea (Pexel stock shot). I guess it's sort of surreal... I like it.
Delighted to see you jump into this one Chuck, I was getting lonely on this thread. And it’s fine to like something just because you like it. There’s a lot of stuff I can offer no more than that about. And a special thanks for sharing your hilarious composite, I love it! I make this kind of stuff all the time, dam birds in libraries, dinosaurs in tree roots, dragons in bubble bottles, kids boarding the Hogwarts express. Yes, they’re surreal, and they are great fun.
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

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Karen
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Post by Karen » Wed Sep 11, 2019 2:16 pm

Oh Charles! Thank you for your clarity of insight! I grinned and giggled the whole time I was reading it!!
I never “studied” Dalí. All I knew was I’d never seen a melting clock, and so I was attracted to it’s newness and it’s clever insistence on purpose. I know I’ll never find one laying around to photograph. However, this exercise has encouraged me to drop “photorealistic” for a moment to see how my next shot changes. And, “I dunno, see if I likes it.”

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minniev
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Post by minniev » Wed Sep 11, 2019 2:44 pm

Karen wrote:
Wed Sep 11, 2019 2:16 pm
Oh Charles! Thank you for your clarity of insight! I grinned and giggled the whole time I was reading it!!
I never “studied” Dalí. All I knew was I’d never seen a melting clock, and so I was attracted to it’s newness and it’s clever insistence on purpose. I know I’ll never find one laying around to photograph. However, this exercise has encouraged me to drop “photorealistic” for a moment to see how my next shot changes. And, “I dunno, see if I likes it.”
Thanks for jumping in here on the Dali thread. Photorealistic is great, but so is imagination. Do both!

BTW, I DID run across a melting clock to photograph, which is what prodded me to do this monthly masters on Dali. Here's a link to the photo (both as shot and doctored up) of the melted clock I ran into amid the throng of shoppers in Andorra a couple of weeks ago. viewtopic.php?f=75&t=4922. You never know what you might find out there, and there are no limits to what you can do with it!
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

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Karen
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Post by Karen » Fri Sep 13, 2019 1:33 pm

Oops. I followed your link, minniev, and left a comment (I was so incredibly impressed). But I don’t know where my comment landed. Apologies, I’m still learning this app.

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minniev
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Post by minniev » Fri Sep 13, 2019 2:58 pm

Karen wrote:
Fri Sep 13, 2019 1:33 pm
Oops. I followed your link, minniev, and left a comment (I was so incredibly impressed). But I don’t know where my comment landed. Apologies, I’m still learning this app.
You're doing fine with the interface, Karen. Your comment landed right where it should, in the image thread itself! Thanks!!
"God gave me photography so that I could pray with my eyes" - Dewitt Jones

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Post by Charles Haacker » Sun Sep 15, 2019 2:49 pm

Karen wrote:
Wed Sep 11, 2019 2:16 pm
Oh Charles! Thank you for your clarity of insight! I grinned and giggled the whole time I was reading it!!
I never “studied” Dalí. All I knew was I’d never seen a melting clock, and so I was attracted to it’s newness and it’s clever insistence on purpose. I know I’ll never find one laying around to photograph. However, this exercise has encouraged me to drop “photorealistic” for a moment to see how my next shot changes. And, “I dunno, see if I likes it.”
Thank you, Karen. You are too kind. I'm usually photorealistic to a fault (why I ain't no artist). It's basically my training and experience in commercial photography, but every now and then I go a little nuts. :D
Friends call me Chuck. :photo: This link takes you to my Flickr albums. Please click on any album to scroll through it.
(I prefer to present pictures in albums because I can put them in specific order.)

All the great photographers use cameras! No, really. :|

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